Rare New Hybrid Giant Crown of Thorns Euphorbia Milii LAK CHAI Corona de Cristo

Rare New Hybrid Giant Crown of Thorns Euphorbia Milii LAK CHAI Corona de Cristo
Rare New Hybrid Giant Crown of Thorns Euphorbia Milii LAK CHAI Corona de Cristo
Rare New Hybrid Giant Crown of Thorns Euphorbia Milii LAK CHAI Corona de Cristo
Rare New Hybrid Giant Crown of Thorns Euphorbia Milii LAK CHAI Corona de Cristo
Rare New Hybrid Giant Crown of Thorns Euphorbia Milii LAK CHAI Corona de Cristo
Rare New Hybrid Giant Crown of Thorns Euphorbia Milii LAK CHAI Corona de Cristo
Rare New Hybrid Giant Crown of Thorns Euphorbia Milii LAK CHAI Corona de Cristo
Rare New Hybrid Giant Crown of Thorns Euphorbia Milii LAK CHAI Corona de Cristo
Rare New Hybrid Giant Crown of Thorns Euphorbia Milii LAK CHAI Corona de Cristo
Rare New Hybrid Giant Crown of Thorns Euphorbia Milii LAK CHAI Corona de Cristo
Rare New Hybrid Giant Crown of Thorns Euphorbia Milii LAK CHAI Corona de Cristo
Rare New Hybrid Giant Crown of Thorns Euphorbia Milii LAK CHAI Corona de Cristo

Rare New Hybrid Giant Crown of Thorns Euphorbia Milii LAK CHAI Corona de Cristo

This cultivar was developed by the owner of Ek Udom Garden in Thailand. His hybrids are winners from various Euphorbia Milii competitions held occasionally in Thailand. He breeds Crown of Thorns of excellent traits, reason why his cultivars always win.

And no, he doesn't sell online. Blooms of Lak Chai are huge and numerous, up to 32 flowers per stalk. Depending on the season, flower color comes in many tones: cream to yellow to pink to orange to red. Summer color is lighter while winter color is more on the red side.

Note: the clusters can become heavy since the flowers are huge and numerous (one cluster alone can be as big as your head) hence the plant needs to be up potted into a large size pot using a good, well draining potting soil. These are tested-and-proved varieties, supplied by a controlled plant exporter and is one of the leading Euphorbia Milii growers in Thailand. I do local sales and I also operate other online stores I reserve the right to take off any of my listings without prior notice. These pictures are not photo shopped, altered nor enhanced in any way whatsoever.

Photos of blooms taken from mother plants may vary slightly due to light conditions, and/or your own computer setting. Most of what I offer are small plants, some blooming, some with flower buds and sometimes, I offer rooted cuttings that have no leaves, buds nor flowers. As with most cultivars, the size and quantity of blooms develop in conjunction with the age of the plant, thus starter or young plants have starter-sized blooms and fewer in number as well. Thorns are protected with tissue papers to avoid punctures to the leaves, that way youll receive your plant in pristine condition.

Many cultivars change flower color depending on the weather. A white variety in summer can be pink during winter or a pink bloomer in winter can be orange in summer.

Others would exhibit multiple color changes from newly opened bud to maturity. If you have any questions, suggestions or simply want more info regarding Euphorbia milii culture and care, please let me know and I will get back to you ASAP.

Crown of Thorns, botanically called Euphorbia Milii , is a woody, spiny, succulent shrub, member of the Euphorbiaceae family and a cousin of the renowned Christmas plant, the Poinsettia. The true flowers of E.

Milii are pretty tiny, and the showy, colorful portion of the terminal inflorescence, is a modified pair of bracts botanically called cyatophylls. The bracts range from tiny to extra-large in diameter and comes in various color tones. Its thick fleshy leaves, produced on top growth are obovate in shape. Stem is slender to stout. Some varieties are compact growing others can reach as tall as 5 feet.

Bracts of modern hybrids are interestingly large and flowers are amazingly by the multitude, up to 32 flowers per cluster, and they come in myriad of colors not only single-colored bracts but bi-colors and tricolors as well. Doesnt need a lot of water as it blooms better when kept on the drier side. Easy to grow, easy to care for. Water and walk away, no pruning, no dead heading. One of the toughest plant in the regnum plantae.

Tolerates neglect pretty well, can handle low temps up to 36°F and flourishes under the hellish Texas summer heat. Contrary to common belief COT blooms without the aid of fertilizers (just look at my plants). If in doubt, a once-a-year feeding of bone meal is sufficient OR repot your COT every 2 years replacing 90% of the old media with a fresh one. Blooms last for long weeks, some even months.

Most cultivars change bloom color during the winter, some acquire deeper tones, others develop dark spots. Self-pollinate easily creating a next generation of new flower color, form, shapes and sizes. Roots easily, making propagation a breeze. Stick one or two cuttings to give as a gift to your friends, relatives or neighbors. Pot your newly arrived Crown of Thorns in a small pot, 3-inch diameter for starter plants and 4-inch diameter for bigger plants and stake if necessary.

Use a highly draining fertilizer-free potting mix. Seed starting mix is good for the job, add more perlite for better aeration and DO NOT fertilize. Water your plant when the surface is dry to the touch (keep the soil constantly moist but not soggy). Place your plant on a spot where it receives good sunlight, at least 4 hours. After a month or two, when your plant is well established, repot your Crown of Thorns in a decorative flowerpot of your choice, 6-inch diameter is ideal, and use a good potting mix.

Do not add fertilizer when using a commercial potting mix as these mixes already contain enough fertilizers, only replenish fertilizer after 4 or 6 months (please refer to the information written on the fertilizer bag). A teaspoon of bone meal OR a pinch of smart-release balanced fertilizer can be incorporated into the potting mix during repotting. Use a liquid balanced fertilizer at half strength every 10 days during the warmest months and once a month at full strength during the colder months. Stop fertilizing during winter when natural light levels are low and temperatures dip below 35F. To keep your COT constantly blooming; keep your plant away from garden sprinklers and move your plant into a shadier area during the long, hot days of summer.

Brief History of Crown of Thorns. Euphorbia milii, with the common names Crown of Thorns , Christ Plant or Christ Thorns hails from Madagascar, a large island situated in the western Indian Ocean, about 225 miles off the east coast of South Africa. The Latin name, Euphorbia, was coined by King Juba II of Numidia (present day Algeria) after he was treated with a certain potent medicinal plant. He named this plant after his Greek doctor Euphorbus who obtained the plant from Morocco in the Atlas Mountains.

King Juba II reigned from between 29 BC-27 BC till his death in 23 AD. However it was only in 1753 when Euphorbia was officially established as the botanical name for this genus of plants in the Euphorbiaceae family.

The label Milii on the other hand, came from the family name of Baron Milius who was then the governor of Reunion, a tropical island located in the Indian Ocean east of Madagascar. He was instrumental in bringing the species to France in 1821 thus Milii was named in his honor. Interestingly, Crown of Thorns, as commonly called in the English speaking countries, was the plant (branches of this plant) that was braided by the Roman soldiers and placed it on Jesus head during His crucifixion - so the legend goes. The original Crown of Thorns are long, malleable, easily woven to create a hoop. , there exist ample proof of the species existence in the Middle East even before the time of Christ. Common names of plants are derived from the plants usage in the past, so I have read from botanical books. Sometimes though, as is the case in some countries, a plant can acquire its name through superstitions, legends, folklores. In Thailand, where the plant is extremely popular (thanks to the Chinese who brought the plant to the Island), its name is Poysean , meaning eight saints: Poy being eight and sean being saints. Milii typically has eight flowers per cluster hence the name, which refers to the eight saints in Chinese mythology. The legend goes to tell that the eight saints sacrificed all their golds, intelligence and spirit to advocate righteousness and justice. By honoring the saints, one will receive good luck according to the specific mythical power of each of the saints: health, bravery, wealth, beauty, artistry, cleverness, poetry and victory over evil spirits. The Thais highly regard the plant as a lucky charm, a good-luck plant, a symbol of good fortune. They put their potted plants in strategical positions around their houses to invite these positive forces. They believe that the more bloom their Poysean produces, the more luck the household would receive.

Various factors like plant age, nutrition, light intensity, soil pH, climatic conditions, can affect the size, quantity and color intensity of bracts. Actual colors of blooms and the colors seen on the photos may vary due to camera pixels and also to different monitor settings. The item "Rare New Hybrid Giant Crown of Thorns Euphorbia Milii LAK CHAI Corona de Cristo" is in sale since Monday, June 29, 2020. This item is in the category "Home & Garden\Yard, Garden & Outdoor Living\Plants, Seeds & Bulbs\Plants & Seedlings\Cacti & Succulents".

The seller is "euphorbiamiliigarden" and is located in Dickinson, Texas. This item can be shipped worldwide.
Rare New Hybrid Giant Crown of Thorns Euphorbia Milii LAK CHAI Corona de Cristo